About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
FBC 25
CNBC 19
KQED (PBS) 5
CSPAN2 4
KQEH (PBS) 4
CSPAN 3
LINKTV 2
CNNW 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 74
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
the chairmen write a budget that balances that would make this economy much better. and i thank the chair and will yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the clerk will report the amendments that are in order en bloc. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposed amendments en bloc for mrs. murray, amendment number 433 for mr. hatch amendment number 297, for ms. stabenow amendment number 432, for mr. grassley amendment number 156, for ms. mikulski amendment number 431, for ms. ayotte amendment number 158, for mr. cruz amendment number 202, for mrs. murray amendment numbered 439, for mr. crapo amendment numbered 222, for mrs. she haoepb amendment -- shihan amendment number 438. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: mr. president, i want all of our members to understand that the second amendment that we will be voting on tonight is the ryan budget. there seems to be some resistance among my republican colleagues in bringing up the house republican budget for a vote, and it's pretty easy to see why that is. last year's house repu
corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
laugh. we'll get his prediction where natural gas prices are headed next. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendar kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain wi the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for thehird straight seson. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. th parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potent
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
economist. we're talking extraordinary weakness here, especially in the two most important economies, germany and france. >> yes. what we saw towards the beginning of the year, what we were hoping was we would see in the u.s. in the second quarter and maybe a third number. what these number res sharing, while we're seeing the rate of contraction to ease in the third quarter, around 4.6% declines. what we saw at the end of the quarter, regathering momentum and that puts the usa in a weak position heading into the second quarter. >> i was going to ask, too, the there's any way, these are sentiment surveys. these are not going on out and measuring production. what it does, it oles the companies themselves, asks them about data. pretty reliable whether it's the u.s. version of these or the global ones with tracking equity prices. and the point here is, this is the first reading of sentiment in march. yet it doesn't seem as though this was necessarily nud by the latest out of cypress. this would have all fallen before this happened. >> yeah. it's asking for hard information whether it is
for future bailouts. but making large depositors pay will hurt the wider economy, too. and that's the big question. yes, cyprus has been saved from bankruptcy and will remain in the euro zone, but at what price? some are estimating that with the reduction in the banking sector and with higher taxes, the cypriot economy could shrink by 10%. with years of hardship. and that is the big unknown. will the rescue end uncertainty or will cyprus end up like some of the other bailed out countries, with a lost generation, facing recession and job losses? >> pretty grim prospects in cyprus. and in a speech to the cypriot people tonight, the president called the deal painful but he said it was the best he could get. for more on the reaction there, i spoke to the bb's tim wilcox. we have now some clarity on the deal that cyprus has struck with europe. does it look like the island's actually going to be worse off because of this? >> it's instinct because i've just been talking to one of the m.p.'s who voted against the proposals last week, which was going to have a 10% levy or hair cut on deposits over
cyprus get to this point? >> it is a small country. its economy is based on three things. tourism, a very pleasant place for people to go. shipping, as befits an island. above all, what is euphemistically called finance. in the 1990's and early in this century, what the banks in cyprus did was offer themselves around the world as a wonderful place to come and make a deposit. we will convert whatever currency you have into euros, which is a very good currency to have. we will pay you an unusually high interest rate and ask no questions. this is often called good banking. they got a lot of deposits. depending on the estimates you believe, the total deposits in the bank of cyprus or five to eight times larger than the total gdp of that economy, which is an absurd situation. and those banks in cyprus took all of those deposits and they did what banks are supposed to do, find prudent, safe, non- risky investments. like all the banks and the last 20 years, they failed. they found that investments. they did not to prudently. the banks fell apart. the whole cyprus economy, already impacted by thi
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
to give the state all of our resources which would be at least 3 billion euros to help the economy. maybe a little bit of help from heaven. back over to you. >> the archbishop, this is something people should go look up this piece of the story. this is a fascinating piece. he's seen as this spiritual leader there who has been quite vocal. he's been out there talking saying let's get out of the euro and go back to the pound. do we have carolyn? can i briefly ask what it's like on the ground there? we understand that it may be several more days, not just thursday, before people can access their money in cyprus. >> absolutely. initially we know that banks were going to be closed up until tomorrow but at this point there's a lot of speculation that banks will be closed up until tuesday because monday is another bank holiday and at this point it's very, very uncertain that we'll get a viable plan b to get the bailout deal in place at this point it doesn't look like we'll get it by tomorrow. at this point we are expecting that banks are going to be closed for a little bit longer. of course that
's face it. cyprus is a small economy. the smallest thread can unravel the entire tapestry of the euro zone. the size of cyprus is not the point here. the point is the principle, precedent and risk of contagion spiralling out of control. >> that's how we see it here. thank you, charles dallara. now it's time to ask the money question. will cyprus and the eu woes kill our economic optimism? we'll debate that next up. the real loser could be crooked russian billionaires whose money-laundering operations in cyprus run the country. that's why vladimir putin is so angry about this bank tax. feel like capitalism may be the best bet to prosperity, but there is not one ounce of free market capitalism in this cyprus story. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it ge
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
and that will lead to a decline in the money that is slowing around the economy and that means lower output essentially. so what we're looking at here in cyprus is that the retracted recession is not depression. let's continue with the discussion with professor pisteritus. thank you so much for joining us this morning. just how do you read the deal? did the germans win in the end? >> well, i would have to agree with you that what the germans wanted has happened in the end. it's an incredibly bad deal for the eurozone. cyprus is table because you are taking away from the island more than half its gdp. you're destroying small enterprises and the sector which accounted for 45% of gdp. expect unemployment to shoot up. we are not sure what the next step in this model is going to to be, but what has even wider implications is that the for the first time within the eurozone, depositors had to bail out ailing banks. and that happened in the 1930s. there were bank runs. we introduced deposit insurance. we introduced polling schemes for risk. in europe, we are headed for a banking union next year so
in macau's economy. 2013 will look good. melco crown and boyd gaming also a standout. "after the bell" starts right now. david: so here's question, when is it tir moyle actually good for the markets and the economy? well, when it is overseas. renowned professor jeremy siegel telling us why the european crisis could be a win for the u.s. and send the markets soaring to 16,000. liz: protesters are a win for us. we'll fund out more from dr. siegel. we know the feeling standing on the corner waiting for the taxis and being surprised how much that meter ran up while you sat there in the car with traffic. a new company hopes to make that aggravation go away by making taxis obsolete. ceo of sidecar is joining us. david: want to hear about that story coming up. we'll tell you what drove today's markets with today's data download. it is a down day on wall street as investors worry what is next for the eurozone. stocks gave up gains on all three major indices, ending the trading day low. industrials and materials led the decline. well the euro extending its losses against the dollar falling mor
. no doubt about that. it could hurt the economy by ten gdp points. joblessness but the banks were going collapse anyway. the economy would be in shambles anyway. there is concern that the depositors are hurt, because what is happening is if you have more than 100,000 in euros in the bank, those are targeted to help with the bail-out. $4.2 billion. a lot of that is from russian. a lot of -- he would cry about that. this is a good thing. bail-in, instead of bail-out. you take in a model where you are forcing the bank to save itself. the shareholders, bondholders and go to the uninsured depositors. this is a lesson we might take here. rather than the taxpayers bail-out you have the bail-out within the institution. i understand the pain but i don't think it's a bad idea. >> you float the idea of going after the saving account. it doesn't rez nay with many folks. >> but they weren't insured. they weren't insured over $100,000. here they aren't over $100,000. you know, you know when you put something in a bank like, that i covered the savings and the loan crisis in '80s. people were hurt in t
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
home building numbers today too. >> that too. we're in a niche market. the u.s. has had their economy outperform other economies and i think it's a flight to safety relative to the u.s. markets on one hand and it's an unwind from the bond market and risk exposure going forward to rate changes on the other hand. so it's both a flight to safety as well as, you know, what's really going on domestically and people are looking at a twist now with the fed and what their posture will be heading forward. >> i'll be back, adobe earnings at the top of the hour. >> take care, maria. >> what do you think? we're finishing positive here. this market doesn't want to go up? you think some of that's short covering? >> i think that's what we're see right now. finishing up the day. right now people will have to play it cautiously. we haven't seen the end of the cyprus thing. we have some negotiating going on from russia. the impact of that, as you mentioned, is a little minor relative to the size and scope of them, but it's whether or not that moves into italy, spain, as we've all been talking about. >>
. let's take a pause to digest all of what's going on. >> there are two economies here. kb homes, lennar, sherwin williams, whirlpool. there is the economy defined by fedex, by caterpillar and this morning by yorele cal. i was on the call last night. the cisco downgrade today. this dichotomy is allowing i think bernanke to not have to taper off. at the same time it calls into question how weak is that international market. seems very weak. >> did we get largely what we wanted from the fed yesterday? there were no big surprises within that. >> no. i think that was the point to not have any big surprises. i think there was a poignant moment yesterday that i think wasn't talked about enough where someone asked imputedly, i felt, because ben bernanke deserves better -- do you know anybody that's unemployed? do you note price of a gallon of milk? he came back, yes, i have a relative on unemployment. he's going to get unemployment down then we'll talk about tapering. until then we are playing a parlor game with the fed. i believe bernanke when he says these things. >> there's no reason to beli
to see to tame these large banks and give us a stable financial system that supports the real economy, not just trading profits of a large financial institution. >> were you surprised by anything you heard at those hearings? >> i was. i viewed i, like a lot of peopl jpmorgan chase as a free will managed bank. i was surprised at them to build these huge positions and even when he started calling foul, the next level of management above him really didn't get on top of it. i was not surprised by appalled by the way they were manipulating their models that are supposed to be able to determine how much risk is involved in various trading positions. >> what advantage did they gain from manipulating those positions? >> well, there were a couple things going on. one was it was clear they were trying to boost their regulatory capital ratios in anticipation of new capital rules coming into effect. this is a key defect with the way regulators bank. regulators view capital adequacy at these large banks. they left those capital ratios to be determined in part by the risk models of the banks. the b
. >> for years and years and years. what does it mean to our economy? >> what it means to our economy, the lawmakers, what gaur gary b is correct. voters are not against this, voters are against this. and like trying to find the bravest frenchman, it's tough to find an honest one out there. >> and this is by the way-- >> and this is the entire french vote and i don't care how. >> they don't want this. >> and here is the difference, here is the difference. >> and one thing about this is, even if everybody in the world is doing it, it is still wrong. congress comes out and says, we don't want pork and they also said we're going to stand up for simpson bowls and cut spending and raiserevenue, we can't do that. they all say they're against pork and every single one of them do it, it's a systemic problem and it's a character problem that we have indeed seen and it means these guys are not doing it for our country. >> john, one thing, take a breath for god's sake. the issue here is that if jonas got, you know, the extra bonus coming early. taxpayers weren't paying for it. in this situation,
to the forefront and that's more important. the u.s. economy, china and although there is a big idea they're stealing customer's money and savings accounts is abomination, i believe it's a different european country. entered the european union in 2008, i don't think it will be as big of a deal as people think, i think it will be on the headlines for two weeks. stuart: all right, let's see what's happening on the opening bell, upside. and i'm looking for a gain of 20, 30 points for the time they're open, 10 points higher, 14,462. nicole, let's bring you in. one of your favorite stocks, we're watching it closely. yoga pants, they say they're too sheer. in other words, you can see through them. i think that the stock is way down. nicole: it is way down. it's going to hurt their bottom line. and they're talking about bringing in the pants that are sheer. that basically is like a fall for the company, you can't have pants that are sheer. i have to admit my lululemon, i noticed recently is sheer and it's no joke and you're able to bring them back in, but it's going to hurt their revenue and bot
's going in the wrong direction now. sandra: saying more federal spending will help the economy, not something that all of us believe is true to be the case. >> no, but i got to go back a little bit there. it's absolutely true that he did miscalculate because neither the president nor myself nor many rational people -- sandra: would he admit that? >> yeah, i think he might, i don't know. nobody thought the house republicans were crazy enough to go through this ridiculous -- sandra: were they crazy? the sun came up. we get through the airport lines -- >> let me address that -- you guys had a ball on this, well, the sun came up, nothing changed. you may live to regret that because, you know, these problems are coming, and, in fact, today, michele bachmann, of all people, was decrying the sequester. why? because an airport in her district lost its tower and has been affected. the cuts are coming. in fact, the only thing that's fore stalled it a bit is the deal made on the continuing resolution. sandra: dan, i argue, however, immediately following, we saw the government, the adminis
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
of energy conclude we can safely export natural gas, this is not even about a trade off between the economy and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. ne
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
good performance of the german economy throughout the year. actually, we are forecasting a growth from around 2% quarter on quarter. and this is on the back of very strong labor markets. >> 2% growth in which quarter? >> basically on average. >> over the year. >> no. for the full year, i would have 11%. but quarter on quarter, up around 2%. why is that? very strong labor market, very strong export. i think more importantly, we should look at next month's bmis. the u.s. data came very strong. we should see a strong performance in germany on the back of the exports. >> you could make that argument on the pmi in germany and it was surprisingly weak. a deep contraction in the fourth quarter was going to rebound now called into question. >> i think this will be the growth. but you've seen in the labor market, you've seen hard data, actually, a strong performance of the economy. so we -- i think we should not expect a continuous increasing pmi, a continuous increase in ifo business index. i think the big question is the next one, in my opinion, just what they said, the u.s. bring very strong
companies. real innovative companies popping up. that is what i worry about the u.s. economies. where are those bold innovative companies. and i would make another footnote about the buybacks. yes, record numbers since 2009. but that is because the feds are buying back their own shares. they say let them pass the stress test. they really struggle and diluted earnings per share. diluted their capital base with a lot of shares during the crisis. they have basically flooded the market to recapitalize and buying it back. the. neil: in cyprus explodes and banks reopened, let's see what happens to the residents of cyprus. people say oh, we are there for you. then you realize that they aren't. have a good weekend >> welcome, i am shibani joshi and four gerri willis. we will tackle the new blackberry. as i don't have anything to worry about? we will discover andalk about that as well. and the faa starts to close air traffic control towers. we will tell you how that ca affect your travel plans going into the spring. but first, raising $8.5 billion and euros needed to see the bailout from the e
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
go, the economy comes to lif norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. david: five seconds away. s&p futures are closing let's head back to tim mulholland in the pits of the cme. what are you see, tim? >> we're closing near the highs. slow volume day. next week is the first week of the -- last weeks of the first quarter. so i think that we're looking at some regional fed manufacturing indexes, and end of the quarter. this market sits back a little, one step back, two steps forward. david: everyone wants to it is friday. everybody take a breath. tim, thanks very much. >> sure. shibani: shares of grocery conglomerate supervalu are soaring today. let's head back to the floor of the new york stock exchange and sandra smith with the latest. sandra? >> hey, david, hey, shibani. investors of supervalu the supermarket chain are breathing a fresh air as the stock is trading over 15 million shares. the basically the grocery store chain announced it closed a many could plex deal where cerberus capital management led group slimmed down the supermarket portfolio of this company. they sh
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
crude prices can tell us about the broader economy. stick around. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm joe kernen along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. u.s. equity futures at this hour after giving back about 62, well off the lows yesterday. indicated that a bounce a little, but a time can happen between thou and 9:30 on the east coast. there's energy, you see crude
that the economy is not growing. all wee doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're contracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, aays great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thghts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on e world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it was an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress i now learning th it made serious mistakes. it tried to take the eurozone, the european commission, the international monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how they got in this position. they were reminded of that by the russians who reje
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)